Thursday, April 9, 2020

William Shakespeare Life Essays - William Shakespeare, Kings Men

William Shakespeare Life On April 26, 1564, John Shakespeare's son, William, was baptized at the Stratford Parish Church. No one knows for certain when his birthday was. (Brown 22) It was thought that young Shakespeare began attending school at the age 7, in Stratford. (Wadsworth 344) Before Shakespeare reached the age of 13, his family endured hardships. Shakespeare's formal schooling ceased. At that time, William may have begun helping his father in the gloving business. (Wright 22) "There is historical warrant for such an approach. Christian images, of course, pervade Shakespeare's culture, throughout his career he obviously thought in terms of them. If those images are themselves frequently allegorical, and we should consider the extent to which the allegories are incorporated into the living texture of Shakespeare's creations." (Kirch 18) At a young age Shakespeare may have viewed annual plays and seen traveling artists. These performances possibly ignited a spark that continues to burn. (Wright 20) William Shakespeare was an Englishman who wrote poems and plays. According to many he was labeled as one of "the greatest dramatists the world has ever known and the finest poets" who wrote in the English language. Shakespeare's work relied mostly on his instincts of nature. His understanding of other people allowed him to fully grasp the quality he wrote of. (Wadsworth 342) John Shakespeare married Mary Arden in 1557. Both the Shakespeare's and the Arden's were farmers, and sold their products to make a living. (Brown 23) Shakespeare had two sisters. Joan died in 1562; Margaret died at infancy. Then in 1566 Gilbert was born. In 1569 a second child named Joan was born; in 1571 came Anne, who died when she was eight year's old. Richard was then born in 1574 followed by Edmund in 1580. (25) William Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway at the age of 18. Anne was at least 8 years her husband's senior. The marriage record dates November 27, 1582 in an Episcopal register found in Worchester. (45-46) The custom in Stratford after the eldest son married, was for the new couple to live in the house of the groom's father. In all likelihood, Shakespeare obeyed the customary procedure. (Wright 24) Shakespeare and his wife probably had a good and happy marriage. She gave birth only 6 months after they were legally wed. (Wilson 43) Shakespeare's son named Hamnet was only 11 years old when he died. He also had a daughter named Judith. Judith Shakespeare had 3 sons who died at young ages. Shakespeare's only bloodlines were the descendants of his (second) sister Joan. (Brown 25-26) Between 1585 and 1592, there was no account of a man named William Shakespeare. Typically referred to as the lost years. There were no records of his life. Some scholars believe he was living in London serving as an apprentice. Others believe he retreated and wrote under a fake name. (Wadsworth 345) At about age 20, some people thought young William stole a dear from a wealthy man in order to poach. A crime not tolerated during that period. (Wright 6) Eight years before the death of Shakespeare he wrote 4 new plays. Some scholar's debate, which plays, was his last. Very little was known about him before the age of 28. (Wilson 38) He continued to visit Stratford on occasion. (Wadsworth 347) He bought a house in London where he gradually retired. On April 23, Shakespeare was laid to rest inside the Stratford Parish Church in 1616. Shakespeare was a young 52 when he died. (Wadsworth 347) "For nearly a century after his death Shakespeare remained more a theme for criticism by the few than a subject of adulation by the many." (Brown, 2) William Kent erected a stone statue of William Shakespeare. The statue is located in the Poet's Corner of Westminster Abby. (Wright 8) Shakespeare may not have felt a calling to write when he left Stratford, but he had a lot to learn in the big city of London. (44-45) After Shakespeare went to London, he joined an acting group. He had no experience. He was merely a performer. (43) William Shakespeare was an important part of a troupe called the Lord Chamberlains Men. He eventually became an honored senior member. (11) Writing plays soon became a demanding business. Companies were always looking for new material. With few new plays, companies began paying for the plays. Once a play was sold it became the property of the company. (44-45) Shakespeare wrote 37 plays. The plays were separated into three basic categories: comedy, tragedy, and history. (Wadsworth 342) With

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Utilitarian

Mill's Utilitarianism: Sacrifice the innocent for the common good? When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentialist issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experience; however, no method of reconciling an individual decision with the rules of experience is suggested, and no relative weights are assigned to the various considerations. In deciding whether or not to torture a terrorist who has planted a bomb in New York City, a utilitarian must evaluate both the overall welfare of the people involved or effected by the action taken, and the consequences of the action taken. To calculate the welfare of the people involved in or effected by an action, utilitarianism requires that all individuals be considered equally. Quantitative utilitarians would weigh the pleasure and pain which would be caused by the bomb exploding against the pleasure and pain that would be caused by torturing the terrorist. Then, the amounts would be summed and compared. The problem with this method is that it is impossible to know beforehand how much pain would be caused by the bomb exploding or how much pain would be caused by the torture. Utilitarianism offers no practical way to make the interpersonal comparison of utility necessary to compare the pains. In the case of the bomb exploding, it at least seems highly probable that a greater amount of pain would be caused, at least in the present, by the bomb exploding. This probability suffices for a quantitative utilitarian, but it does not account for the consequences, which create an entirely di... Free Essays on Utilitarian Free Essays on Utilitarian Mill's Utilitarianism: Sacrifice the innocent for the common good? When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentialist issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experience; however, no method of reconciling an individual decision with the rules of experience is suggested, and no relative weights are assigned to the various considerations. In deciding whether or not to torture a terrorist who has planted a bomb in New York City, a utilitarian must evaluate both the overall welfare of the people involved or effected by the action taken, and the consequences of the action taken. To calculate the welfare of the people involved in or effected by an action, utilitarianism requires that all individuals be considered equally. Quantitative utilitarians would weigh the pleasure and pain which would be caused by the bomb exploding against the pleasure and pain that would be caused by torturing the terrorist. Then, the amounts would be summed and compared. The problem with this method is that it is impossible to know beforehand how much pain would be caused by the bomb exploding or how much pain would be caused by the torture. Utilitarianism offers no practical way to make the interpersonal comparison of utility necessary to compare the pains. In the case of the bomb exploding, it at least seems highly probable that a greater amount of pain would be caused, at least in the present, by the bomb exploding. This probability suffices for a quantitative utilitarian, but it does not account for the consequences, which create an entirely di...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

In an essay of at least six paragraphs and at least 750 words, discuss

In an of at least six paragraphs and at least 750 words, discuss the positive and negative aspects of living ones life according to the carpe diem philos - Essay Example 17). Either one of these writers would be accurate in their general concept; carpe diem is, in its literal Latin meaning, â€Å"seize the moment.† How that philosophy is translated into the life of men and women has been the source of much reflection over the centuries. However, for purposes of this paper, we will focus on the philosophy of the two authors already mentioned, and how those philosophies might manifest in the lives of the contemporary person. To live in the moment, Sneed suggests, is not to dwell on the past at length, but to take the lesson of the past, be aware of it, but to live in the moment armed with the knowledge of the past (p. 1). Lowrie takes the concept of living in the present, armed with the poetics of the past, to the issue of lyrics (1997, p. 1). That lyrics, song, poetry is tangential to living in the moment, even when the lyrics and the poetry are of the past they are translated according to the moment of the present (p. 1). To this extent, consider the Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The play has been done in its classical version, that is, true to the poetry of the original writing; and in contemporary style, that is taking the poetry of the past, and putting it into the language of the present; carpe diem. The contemporary productions of the play have brought the lessons of the past to the moment of the present, seizing the moment to use what has been proven as a teaching tool in the past, to i nfluence the minds and hearts of young people in the present. â€Å"Because the central didactic message of the Odes is carpe diem, a maxim that not only enjoins us to live in the present, but evokes the poetry of the present: its locus is the symposium (Davis, 1991). Sympotic poetry entails conversation and song, but song that keeps to the moment, inscribes its own occasion, and does not go on at length about the events of the mythic past (Lowrie,

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Employee retention Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 words

Employee retention - Essay Example One of the first things a company can implement to retain employees is to offer benefits both tangible and intangible. According to the article â€Å"His job: helping employers hold on to their staff; High turnover can be costly. Consultant says its vital to offer respect, good pay, retirement plan† by Kasandra Kyle the most important thing that a potential employer can offer a new employee is good pay, respect and a retirement package . These benefits help make employees comfortable in their current position and will retain an employee sometimes even when another job offer with a more lucrative offer comes around. Another fringe benefit is the flexible work schedule. Although this is not practical in all cases, if it is at all possible it serves as an excellent retention strategy. Offering tangible and intangible benefits are essential, but it is imperative to work diligently to keep specialty trained staffers. The low turnover of maintaining skilled employees offers the benefits of low turnover and positions companies for growth. The author goes on to say that the cost of training specialty staffers can cost the company valuable time, enormous finances and slowed production (Kyle, 2008). Although it is important to offer workplace benefits at your larger companies, it is dire to offer those benefits at a small business. The article, â€Å"Workplace benefits are strategic in small business† states that recent study performed by MetLife’s annual Employee Benefits Trends study shows more than half (55%) of smaller employers, those with fewer than 500 employees say benefits play a very important role in employee retention. However, there is contradictory results as the study goes on to reveal that only 34% of workers at smaller employers say the benefits they receive are a very important reason to remain with their employer, versus 53% at larger firms. In addition, just 37% of employees at smaller corporations say they are

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Compare and Contrast Essay Example for Free

Compare and Contrast Essay All interesting authors expose their readers to experience the essence of the story. In this case, Toni Cade Bambara uses the illustration of her short story â€Å"The Lesson†, in order to convey the reality of a 1960’s ghetto, African American community through the eyes of a young girl named Sylvia. Sylvia is a young, fearless girl who has an audacious and outspoken nature despite her constant use of profanity and insulting judgments of Miss Moore. Moreover, Toni Bambara’s technique of literacy in this piece is written in a way that transport the readers to another cultural setting that is condemned by a helpless cycle of economic poverty, which Miss Moore attempts to prevent for the future generation. In addition, Toni Cade Bambara uses her colorful style of tone to express the realism and individualistic characteristic of the urban black community of the 1960s through the use of AAVE, which stands for â€Å"African American Vernacular English. † Through this unique style of writing, Toni Bambara’s goal is to challenge or even question society of its unfair economy. Admittedly, it is true that these kids have inherited poor values from their parents. â€Å"It also touches on the irresponsibility of lower class parents when it comes to raising their children (Friedman 2). † This is where Miss Moore, the antagonist, comes in. She tries to show these kids what it means to have opportunity to be successful and have a nice life. â€Å"She’d been to college and said it was only right that she should take responsibility for the young ones’ education. And she not even related by marriage or blood (pg. 183). † The author portrays Miss Moore as being a proper adult figure for the kids as she shows them the world other than the one they live in. In the beginning of the story, many readers are startled at the fact that Sylvia explicitly uses profanity like it is apart of her everyday speech. She states, â€Å"And the starch in my pinafore scratching the shit outta me and I’m really hating this nappy-head bitch and her goddam college degree (pg. 183). † Toni wanted to make Sylvia seem as realistic as possible, and with Sylvia’s lower class, ghetto background speaking properly would not seem as authentic to the setting and situation. As an African American herself, Bambara portrays Sylvia almost as a realistic figure influenced by her childhood. â€Å"This dialect emphasizes the children’s distance from mainstream white bourgeois culture and economic power. However, Bambara also celebrates AAVE to express her self-confidence, assertiveness, and creativity as a young black women (Janet Ruth Heller 1). † At first, Sylvia gives off the impression of being stubborn and loud. She is adverse to Miss Moore’s teachings because simply, she doesn’t understand the underlying messages that Miss Moore attempts to teach these kids. During the exposition, Sugar answers Miss Moore’s question by saying, â€Å"I think†¦ that this is not much of a democracy if you ask me. Equal chance to pursue happiness means an equal crack at the dough, don’t it? (pg. 188)† This moment is the turning point in which changes Sylvia from being a talker to a listener. Although the lesson doesn’t immediately make sense to her, she eventually runs off to let it sink in. After reading the story, the reader is left with a feeling of anticipation for the kids and their future outcome. Although humorous, the story brings up a serious issue of poverty and the economic disparity that these kids experience. Furthermore, at the conclusion of the story Sylvia states, â€Å"We started from the block and she gets ahead which is O. K. by me cause I’m goin to the West End and then over to the Drive to think this day through. She can run if she want to and even run faster. But ain’t nobody gonna beat me at nuthin (pg. 188). † This moment represents hope for Sylvia’s future and her drive to pursue a life other than the one she was brought up to. In this way, Toni wants to convey a message of hope to all kids in Sylvia’s position and that they have to chance to break away from the cycle of poverty and be successful.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Should We Legalize Marijuana? :: Argumentative Persuasive Topics

Should We Legalize Marijuana? In the perspective of America's war on drugs, marijuana is one of the biggest enemies. And since alcohol and tobacco, two life threatening substances, are legal it is a relevant question to ask why marijuana is illegal. The taxpayers of America can partly answer this question when they fill out their tax forms and when they hear the hash rhetoric used against marijuana by the government. The fact that marijuana is illegal is sufficiently caused by the amount of money, jobs, and pride invested in the drug war. In other words, the government cannot turn back now. In order to demonstrate this cause, the difference between illegal and legal substances (specifically alcohol and marijuana) must be abolished. Alcohol, as we all know, was once illegal. The reason that it was illegal was because the ill effects of alcohol led many people to fight for the prohibition cause. Some of these ill effects are direct and some alter the behavior and motor skills of the drinker, helping them do things they would not usually do. More often than not, the direct effects result from heavy drinking, like "depression is frequently diagnosed in alcoholics" (Rittenhouse 140). But just getting drunk can do serious harm. "Accidental trauma forms the major cause of brain damage from alcohol" (140) would indicate alcohol as a threat to human health. Marijuana on the other hand seems a little out of place in its classification as illegal. The source previously cited notes that, "Although it is classified as a Schedule I drug for regulatory purposes, it is clearly different pharmacologically from the opiate analgesics" (Rittenhouse 151). Also, recently a heated debate has arisen on the medicinal value of marijuana. Whether there is a definite use for marijuana is unclear, but there is surely no such debate concerning alcohol. So once again I posture the question why is marijuana illegal if it is not more dangerous than substances that are legal? The American government's investment in the war on drugs spans the spectrum of governmental offices. But the main recipient of funds from the budget is the Drug Enforcement Agency, located in the Department of Justice. Before I start quoting budget allocations, I would like to ask the reader to make a small assumption. The budget does not make distinctions between fighting marijuana and fighting cocaine, heroine, etc. So I would ask that the reader assume marijuana accounts for five percent of the budget's drug prevention allocations.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Down the River Essay

Edward Abbey’s essay Down the River reveals his strong belief that the existence of life revolves around nature itself. Abbey conveys these views through syntax, imagery, and his choice of structure. Abbey’s varying detail and syntax in the first half of the passage conveys an amazement toward nature. He states while gazing at the lion that there was a â€Å"mutual curiosity: [he] felt more wonder than fear†. His unexpected reaction to the mountain lion when they shared â€Å"mutual curiosity† implies that man is not alone in this journey towards knowledge, and there is a deep connection between man and nature. He varies the syntax from short to complex sentences with distinct differences in clauses. He states that later on they â€Å"see no mountain lions,† and the following sentence in a series presents all of the other wildlife that has been observed in great detail instead of the lion. He describes these plants and animals with enthusiasm and also calls Aravaipa â€Å"full of life† and extremely â€Å"beautiful†. The impression is that even though the lion that drew the explorer in is nowhere to be seen, there is still a vast amount of beauty in the desert. The structure is meant to contrast the two types of nature, urban nature and nature in Aravaipa. We see an immediate switch in tone when Abby says, â€Å"We stumble homeward over the stones, and through the anklebone-chilling water. † Abbey displays a hint of bitterness towards his home that is so bad even the journey to get there is torturous. He discusses the stars and how they seem to fade when he leaving the desert, as if the world he is used to has no stars, no beauty, no life. Abby then states that the memories of the beautiful desert are enough to keep him satisfied for days to survive the â€Å"urban life†. Nature is so rich in details and relationships and so wonderful and mysterious that it is impossible to completely understand it. This incomprehensibility can provide an unlimited source of learning that will eventually redeem us from a lifeless urban existence.